Capturing COSTA CONCORDIA by Mike Tattoli

COSTA CONCORDIA at Giglio. Photo by Mike Tattoli 2012.

Globe-trotting ship enthusiast Mike Tattoli was in Italy this past week and took a side trip to Isola del Giglio where the wreck of COSTA CONCORDIA still lies, awaiting salvage.  Mike was kind enough to share his photos and and a brief recap with MaritimeMatters.

COSTA CONCORDIA at Giglio. Photo by Mike Tattoli 2012.

“We took the ferry from the picturesque Porto Santo Stefano in Tuscany. During the 50 minute trip to Giglio,  the ship starts coming into focus and my first impression was that it was a long white factory.  You have to go right by the CONCORDIA as you enter the small, gorgeous port of Giglio.  As I took in this surreal scene, I was thinking,  ‘What a waste!’

COSTA CONCORDIA at Giglio. Photo by Mike Tattoli 2012.

There was no evident attempt to paint over her name or disguise her. CONCORDIA was surrounded by an oil skimming boom and her once immaculate semi-gloss white paint was faded and streaked with rust. Having been submerged for 6 months, the bow had a greenish/blackish moss forming around it.  There was no evidence of petrol or contaminants in the water, which was as pristine as ever. The ship and many parts of it seemed to be frozen at the time of the strike — equipment was covered and deck chairs were tethered to their posts. The angle of the list was evident as doors that were not secured were open to the starboard side. The port bridge wing and navigation console where photos of (ex Captain) Schettino were taken, were untouched & above the fray.

COSTA CONCORDIA at Giglio. Photo by Mike Tattoli 2012.

Two un-launched port side life boats were still secured to the vessel, making one wonder why they waited. The Jacob’s ladder where so many people climbed down the side of the ship is still in place. Omni-present was the reason for the sinking:  the enormous gash in her port side and a boulder that jutted from the engine room as if it were trying to escape. But what was most baffling is that the stabilizer was on the same plane & received no damage.

COSTA CONCORDIA at Giglio. Photo by Mike Tattoli 2012.

Overall, the CONCORDIA looked lifeless, like a doomed ship trying to fight the elements — reminiscent of the photos of DUILIO and GIULIO CESARE at Muggia (near Trieste) at the end of World War Two, just waiting to be raised & dismantled.  I just could not believe my eyes — it was sad, like she wore a death mask of faded paint and ever-increasing rust.”

Mike Tattoli with the COSTA CONCORDIA at Giglio.

With very special thanks to Mike Tattoli

Peter Knego

Peter Knego

Having documented over 400 passenger ships and taken more than 200 cruises, MaritimeMatters’ co-editor Peter Knego is a leading freelance cruise writer, a respected ocean liner historian and frequent maritime lecturer both on land and at sea.  With his work regularly featured in cruise industry trades and consumer publications.  Knego also runs the www.midshipcentury.com website which offers MidCentury cruise ship furniture, artwork and fittings rescued from the shipbreaking yards of Alang, India.  He has produced several videos on the subject, including his latest, The Sands Of Alang and the best-selling On The Road To Alang."
Peter Knego

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