MEIN SCHIFF 5 Floats (With Snow)

MEIN SCHIFF 5 Floats (with Snow)

by Kalle Id

The next newbuilding of Germany’s burgeoning TUI Cruises, MEIN SCHIFF 5, was floated at the Meyer Turku shipyard in Finland in chilly weather on Friday, 15th January. I was there as a representative of the Finnish maritime magazine Ulkomatala (www.ulkomatala.net), who kindly allowed me to share the experience in English with Maritime Matters’ readers.

TUI Cruises website: tuicruises.com

Meyer Turku website: www.meyerturku.fi

All images are in this article are copyright © 2016 Kalle Id.

Arriving at Meyer Turku in heavy snowfall. If you squint, you can see the forward superstructure of the MEIN SCHIFF 5 behind the buildings.
Arriving at Meyer Turku in heavy snowfall. If you squint, you can see the forward superstructure of the MEIN SCHIFF 5 behind the buildings.

Due to train and bus timetables, I arrived half an hour early at the shipyard. The press room was not ready for visitors yet, but the staff kindly allowed me to wait in one of the meeting rooms, instead of having to stand outside in the heavy snowfall. The said room doubled as a storage and was filled with interesting relics from the shipyard’s past, including various builder’s models and even a presentation of the yard’s history that was in itself historical, dating from the time the yard was owned by Wärtsilä.

Flags of various companies the Turku yard has delivered ships to, including Swedish American Line, Steamship Company Bore and Lion Ferry if the foreground. (Okay, so maybe I rearranged them to have the most interesting ones closest to the camera).
Flags of various companies the Turku yard has delivered ships to, including Swedish American Line, Steamship Company Bore and Lion Ferry if the foreground. (Okay, so maybe I rearranged them to have the most interesting ones closest to the camera).
Various models of Turku-built ships on public display in the lobby. I was told the selection is changed occasionally to show different vessels. Seen here on the top row are the Iraqi presidential yacht AL-MANSUR (built during the time Saddam Hussein was considered a good guy), the CRYSTAL SYMPHONY and Aida Cruises’ first newbuilding AIDA (today the AIDACARA), naturally still in her original appearance with Deutsche Seereederei funnel colours. On the bottom row is the South African research vessel S.A. AGULHAS II. She was actually built at Rauma, but the model was brought here after the closure of the Rauma yard.
Various models of Turku-built ships on public display in the lobby. I was told the selection is changed occasionally to show different vessels. Seen here on the top row are the Iraqi presidential yacht AL-MANSUR (built during the time Saddam Hussein was considered a good guy), the CRYSTAL SYMPHONY and Aida Cruises’ first newbuilding AIDA (today the AIDACARA), naturally still in her original appearance with Deutsche Seereederei funnel colours. On the bottom row is the South African research vessel S.A. AGULHAS II. She was actually built at Rauma, but the model was brought here after the closure of the Rauma yard.

Following a brief presentation about the construction process of the MEIN SCHIFF 5, we were herded to a bus, to be given a brief tour of the shipyard itself, and chances to photograph the ship from some unusual vantage points.

Building blocks that will make ship the yard’s next two newbuildings, the MEIN SCHIFF 6 and Tallink’s as-of-yet unnamed Helsinki-Tallinn ferry, were already in advanced state of construction.
Building blocks that will make ship the yard’s next two newbuildings, the MEIN SCHIFF 6 and Tallink’s as-of-yet unnamed Helsinki-Tallinn ferry, were already in advanced state of construction.

Our first stop was the side of the building dock, allowing for views of the ship as she’s “high and dry”.

You rarely see cruise ships in the snow quite like this, but in Finland - or at least Finnish shipyards - it’s a common sight every winter.
You rarely see cruise ships in the snow quite like this, but in Finland – or at least Finnish shipyards – it’s a common sight every winter.

Even better was to come: our bus next navigated through a tunnel, emerging in the bottom of the building dock, giving us a chance to see the MEIN SCHIFF 5 from a rather unusual perspective and even walk below the ship.

The tunnel leading to the building dock, as seen from the bottom.
The tunnel leading to the building dock, as seen from the bottom.
Let it snow (on MEIN SCHIFF 5)!
Let it snow (on MEIN SCHIFF 5)!
A slightly more unusual point-of-view.
A slightly more unusual point-of-view.
A selfie under MEIN SCHIFF 5, showing off my winter gear. I admit I was a bit wary of going underneath the ship at first, but if you’ve got a chance to like that you’ve got to take it!
A selfie under MEIN SCHIFF 5, showing off my winter gear. I admit I was a bit wary of going underneath the ship at first, but if you’ve got a chance to like that you’ve got to take it!

Next, the bus ferried us back up for the actual launching ceremony. The valves allowing water to flood into the drydock were opened by Meyer Turku’s CEO Jan Meyer, together with members of the MEIN SCHIFF 5 team. The signal to open the valves was given by the cannon group of Arma Aboa, a local historical society specialising in weaponry, using a replica of an 18th century cannon. Naturally, the group were dressed in replicas of 18th-century military uniforms, specifically worn during the reign of Karl XII of Sweden.

The MEIN SCHIFF 5 is about to float. For reasons unknown to me, the number on her name was only painted on the starboard side.
The MEIN SCHIFF 5 is about to float. For reasons unknown to me, the number on her name was only painted on the starboard side.
TUI Cruises’ Vice President (Operations) Ferdinand Strohmeyer poses together with the Arma Aboa cannon group.
TUI Cruises’ Vice President (Operations) Ferdinand Strohmeyer poses together with the Arma Aboa cannon group.
I thought I was prepared for the noise of the cannon shot. I was wrong, as this shaky photo taken split-seconds after illustrates.
I thought I was prepared for the noise of the cannon shot. I was wrong, as this shaky photo taken split-seconds after illustrates.
Water starts flooding to the drydock. The following night, it was finally full and the actual floating out could begin.
Water starts flooding to the drydock. The following night, it was finally full and the actual floating out could begin.

After the launch, we returned to the office building for short speeches by Jan Meyer of Meyer Turku and Ferdinand Strohmeyer of TUI Cruises. The latter noted that until today, he had not known you could launch ships with snow. In Finland, anything is possible. 😉

After speeches, we were treated with a rather lovery buffet style lunch. This was followed by chances of social mingling (not to mention further chances to photograph the wonderful builder’s models in the office) before the party dispersed. Meyer Turku kindly allowed me and one other journalist to borrow the bus used to ferry us around the shipyard for a trip back to the city, which certainly made our lives a lot simpler.

Buffet lunch. This is Finland after all, we do love our buffets.
Buffet lunch. This is Finland after all, we do love our buffets.

The MEIN SCHIFF 5 was towed out of the building dock of 3 AM the following night and moved to the outfitting quay. Next, the dock will again be emptied to make room for the next newbuilding, a fast ropax ferry for Tallink’s Helsinki-Tallinn service. This year will be busy for the shipyard, as simultaneously with the new Tallink ship, the MEIN SCHIFF 5’s next sister MEIN SCHIFF 6 will be built. The MEIN SCHIFF 5 will be completed next July, followed by the Tallink ship in early 2017 and the MEIN SCHIFF 6 in summer 2017. After these the yard will deliver two more MEIN SCHIFFs (numbers 7 and 8) in 2018 and 2019, followed by two newbuildings for Costa Cruises in 2019-2020. A sister ship to Tallink’s new ferry might also be slotted into this schedule, as they will reportedly decide within the next weeks whether or not to use the option of a sister ship. So it’s busy times ahead for Meyer Turku!

I think this photo of the builder’s model of the MEIN SCHIFF 4 is a suitable parting shot. The MEIN SCHIFF 5 should also look more-or-less like this in six months.
I think this photo of the builder’s model of the MEIN SCHIFF 4 is a suitable parting shot. The MEIN SCHIFF 5 should also look more-or-less like this in six months.

End of MEIN SCHIFF 5 Floats (With Snow).

Special thanks to Tapani Mylly of Meyer Turku and Olli Tuominen of Ulkomatala

Kalle Id

Kalle Id

Kalle Id, MaritimeMatters' Helsinki correspondent, is a Finnish maritime historian, photographer and journalist, with a Master's Degree in history from the University of Helsinki. His early-age exposure to ferry travel led to a lifetime fascination with passenger ships, both the cruise ferries of his home waters and the cruise ships and ferries of further afield. Kalle maintains his own ship photography blog at kships.blogspot.com. Contrary to the popular belief, he writes under his real name.
Kalle Id
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