Rolling On The River? DELTA QUEEN Bill Passes House

DELTA QUEEN at Paducah, Kentucky. Photo and copyright Peter Knego 2006.
DELTA QUEEN at Paducah, Kentucky. File photo © Peter Knego 2006.

September 25th 2013, the US House of Representatives approved a bill that would grant the historic, now static, DELTA QUEEN a 15 year exemption from a federal fire-retardant materials construction requirement. The bill still has to pass Senate.  If successful there, it will be signed by President Barack Obama.  Representative Steve Chabot, who proposed the bill, is confident, as then-Senator Obama co-sponsored the exemption in 2008.

Paddlewheel included, the DELTA QUEEN is 285 feet long (87 m), the distance across her cambered decks is 60 feet and with a shallow draft of just 9 feet and a flat bottom, the steamer is able to navigate several smaller American rivers.

DELTA QUEEN is currently moored in Chattanooga, Tennessee as a boutique hotel.

Partially built in Scotland, shipped in pieces to Stockton, CA  and assembled in 1926, the DELTA QUEEN and her twin DELTA KING ran on a regular Sacramento River service between San Francisco and Sacramento, with excursions to Stockton, on the San Joaquin River for the California Transportation Company.

From 197o, DELTA QUEEN operated with a presidential exemption to SOLAS regulations prohibiting the operation of overnight passenger vessels with wooden superstructures. Congress continued to grant the 88-stateroom DELTA QUEEN exemptions until 2008, when safety concerns were raised, terminating the exemptions.

On February 11, 2009, DELTA QUEEN arrived in Chattanooga, where she opened as the Delta Queen Hotel on June 5, 2009.

DELTA QUEEN was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1970 and was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1989.

Visit www.save-the-delta-queen.org/ for more information and to join the effort to save the ship.

 

Martin Cox

Martin Cox

MARTIN COX - Founder and publisher of MaritimeMatters, inspired by maritime culture and technology growing up in the port of Southampton. He works as a photographer in Los Angeles, and his works has been exhibited in LA, San Francisco, New York, London and Iceland.Martin is the co-writer of the book “Hollywood to Honolulu; the story of the Los Angeles Steamship Company” published by the Steam Ship Historical Society of America. The Los Angeles Maritime Museum has commissioned artworks and collected his photographs.
Martin Cox
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