NORWEGIAN GETAWAY Floated Out

NORWEGIAN GETAWAY rendering courtesy NCL
NORWEGIAN GETAWAY rendering, courtesy NCL

On November 2, under gray skies, NORWEGIAN GETAWAY was floated out of Meyer Weft’s covered building dock in Papenburg, Germany.

The 146,600-ton ship, sister to NORWEGIAN BREAKAWAY,  has been under construction since the keel was laid in November 2012.  Mid afternoon on a Saturday, the new 4,000-passenger ship departed building dock II, bow first.  Her hull sports artwork designed by Miami artist David “LEBO” Le Batard, featuring a mermaid holding the sun above the waves.

The ship’s float out represents a major milestone in the NORWEGIAN GETAWAY’s construction as she moves into the final phase, with delivery planned on January 10, 2014.

From the press release:

“Hats off once again to the team at MEYER WERFT for building an absolutely spectacular vessel in record time,” said Kevin Sheehan, Norwegian Cruise Line’s chief executive officer. “We are now in the home stretch and looking forward to the launch of Miami’s ultimate ship.”

“This new vessel, built in merely 12 months, is one of the largest and most technologically advanced ships in the world,” said Bernard Meyer, Managing Partner of MEYER WERFT. “We are thrilled to see her leaving the building dock and getting ready for her sea trials.”

NORWEGIAN GETAWAY has an overall length of 324 meters, and is 39.70 meters wide. He conveyance down the River Ems is expected in mid November.

Following the ship’s inaugural events in Europe, New York and Miami,  NORWEGIAN GETAWAY will sail on seven-day Eastern Caribbean cruises departing every Saturday from Miami beginning on February 8, 2014.

Martin Cox

Martin Cox

MARTIN COX - Founder and publisher of MaritimeMatters, inspired by maritime culture and technology growing up in the port of Southampton. He works as a photographer in Los Angeles, and his works has been exhibited in LA, San Francisco, New York, London and Iceland.Martin is the co-writer of the book “Hollywood to Honolulu; the story of the Los Angeles Steamship Company” published by the Steam Ship Historical Society of America. The Los Angeles Maritime Museum has commissioned artworks and collected his photographs.
Martin Cox
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